New York Map Society
Other Map News
Opened June 30, 2016 -- no closing date: "Unlocking Two Revolutionary War
Era Maps: The Ratzer Maps at
Brooklyn Historical Society." August 27th
marked the 240th anniversary of the Battle of Brooklyn, the first major battle of
the American Revolutionary War. In honor of this occasion, Brooklyn Historical
Society is displaying two rare Revolutionary War era maps that chronicle the
landscape of 18th-century Brooklyn in remarkable detail.
Maps.nyc
By Thomas Lowenhaupt
Recent New York City Hall actions point toward the development of an intuitive.
nyc TLD, where the city we know as New Yorkers is mapped, name-for-name,  
to the Internet - more or less. For example, libraries.nyc, schools.nyc,
GreenwichVillage.nyc, Harlem.nyc, and maps.nyc. The first important step in   
this innovative direction was the city’s program for licensing neighborhood
domain names to local nonprofits. Beyond the neighborhood names, the    
Mayor’s Office of Innovation, the entity administering 385 neighborhood   
names, has offered that the Maps.nyc domain name be used to pilot a process
for allocating a range of “city-reserved” domain names.
New York Map   
Society members are invited to contribute their thoughts on developing
Maps.nyc.
It’s a challenging task that requires the stakeholders  in New York  
City’s mapping community to step up with ideas on ownership, governance,
content, design, and a business model. Some preliminary ideas have been
posted here: http://bit.ly/dotnycmaps. Please share news of this initiative with
others in the GIS, mapping, and related communities.
Connecting.nyc Inc. is a NYS nonprofit focused on the development of the    .
nyc TLD as a public interest resource. Contact Tom@connecting.nyc. Visit
connecting.nyc.
New York Map Society member Jack Eichenbaum recommends you see the
exhibition:
"NY at its Core: 400 years of NYC History."  Jack says: "[I] found it
AWESOME (a word I use with discretion!). This exhibit will require multiple
visits, perhaps best in the solitude of nasty winter weekdays. It incorporates
history, geography, ecology, and culture, and the narrative uses words,  
pictures, maps and objects.”