New York Map Society
Upcoming Meetings
Our Primary Meeting Place:
The New York Map Society most often holds its lectures on Tuesday
or Wednesday evenings at the New York Public Library's Stephen A.
Schwarzman [Main] Building at 42nd Street and Fifth Avenue.  
Meetings there are free and open to the public, but space limitations
may require an RSVP to attend.  

Field trips to map sites, special events, and occasional lectures may
held on weekends. Some events are reserved for current-paid
members only, and some field trips are at venues that may require  
an admission fee.

Our Secondary Meeting Place:
Avenues: The World School, Headquarters, 11 East 26th Street,
between Madison and Fifth Avenues.

See our "Map Exhibitions" page for map-related events in the New  
York area and beyond. Contact the sponsoring organization for further
details about those events.
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Saturday, January 13, 2018, 2:00 pm to 3:30 pm:
Ed Redmond
will present “George Washington’s
Manuscript Maps and Surveys: 1748-1799.”
Venue
for t
his free and open-to-the-public event: Avenues:
The World School, 17th Floor, 11 East 26th St.
(between Madison and Fifth Aves
.), New York City.

In addition to his service in the Virginia Regiment, the
Continental Army, and as President of the United
States, George Washington was a prodigious map
maker and consumer of geographic information. This
talk will focus on George Washington’s early
professional land surveys (1748-1752)
, as well maps
Washington prepared for his personal land
speculation activities (1769-1799).

Ed Redmond is President of the Washington Map Society,
member of the
New York Map Society, and Specialist of
Cartographic Reference and
Curator of the Vault
Collections in the Geography & Map Division of the
Library of Congress.
_______________________________________________
Ed Redmond
Washington Map Society
Wednesday, February 7, 6:30 - 7:30 pm: Book talk/signing by
best-selling author Colin Harrison: "You Belong to Me"

This free and open-to-the-public event will be held at Avenues: The
World School, 17th Floor, 11 East 26th St. (between Madison and  
Fifth Avenues), New York City.
Author and map collector Colin Harrison's latest novel, "You Belong to
Me," features a protagonist who is a devoted collector of the maps of
New York City
-- as is Mr. Harrison, as you can see in this interview in
The New York Times.
__________________________________________________________
Wednesday, March 7, 6 pm:
This free and open-to-the-public event will be held at Avenues: The
World School, 17th Floor, 11 East 26th St. (between Madison and  
Fifth Avenues), New York City.
Priyamvada Natarajan, professor of astronomy and physics at Yale
University, and author of "
Mapping the Heavens: The Radical
Scientific Ideas That Reveal the Cosmos," will recount the evolution   
of celestial map-making and show how maps literally track our ever-
evolving cosmic view, tracing our understanding of the universe, its
contents and its evolution.
_______________________________________________________
Priyamvada Natarajan
Colin Harrison in his
Brooklyn brownstone.
Photo:Tony Cenicola,The New York Times
Saturday, April 28, 2 pm:
This free and open-to-the-public event will be held at Avenues: The
World School, 17th Floor, 11 East 26th St. (between Madison and  
Fifth Avenues), New York City.
Mark Monmonier, Distinguished Professor of Geography at the
Maxwell School of Syracuse University, specializing in toponymy,
geography, and geographic information systems, will speak on
"Patents and Plato: Map-related Patents in General, and One
Clever Inventor in Particular."

Map historians have paid little attention to patents even though the
patents system serves as a parallel literature similar in many ways to
cartography’s traditional scientific literature of technical/academic
journals. A search for map-related patents issued by the U.S. Patent
Office from the mid-nineteenth century through the middle third of the
twentieth century uncovered over 300 patents for devices intended to
promote the use of maps and map information. Principal areas of
invention include georeferencing, route following, map folding, map
projection, and globes. That most of these patents were never
manufactured or licensed suggests that the patents system not only
creates an intellectual property right but also satisfies an innovator’s
need for official recognition by an organization that vets useful ideas.
Particularly emblematic is John Byron Plato (1876 – 1966), whose
1915 patent for a method that assigned rural residences a unique
address led to the Index Map Company, an Ithaca, New York, firm he
ran from 1918 to 1931. His invention and entrepreneurial venture
reflects a diverse career as a soldier, draftsman, manufacturer, lumber
yard manager, school teacher, and farmer. After his business failed in
the early years of the Great Depression, he arrived in Washington and
worked for several years as a cartographic consultant of sort to the
Agricultural Adjustment Administration. In 1936, after his patent had
expired, a group of Ithaca businessmen produced largely similar maps
until 1941.
________________________________________________________
Mark Monmonier
Syracuse University,
Department of Geography