New York Map Society
Upcoming Meetings
Our Meeting Places -- both are free and open to the public for our events, but they may
require an RSVP to attend:

Avenues: The World School
, Headquarters, 17th Floor Boardroom, 11 East 26th Street
(between Madison and Fifth Avenues), New York, NY 10011. Photo ID required for entry.

New York Public Library, Stephen A. Schwarzman [Main] Building, 42nd Street and  Fifth
Avenue, New York, NY 10018.  

Field trips to map sites, special events, and lectures may held on weekends. Some events are
reserved for current-paid members only, and some field trips are at venues that may require
an admission fee.

See our "Map Exhibitions" page for map-related events in the New York area and beyond.
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On Saturday, January 26, 2019, at 2 pm: Daniel Crouch, rare
map, atlas and book dealer, will reprise his talk at the
September 2018 San Francisco Map Fair: “There are three
kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics”
Venue: Avenues: The World School, headquarters, 17th Floor
Boardroom, 11 East 26th St. (between Madison and Fifth
Avenues), New York City.
Daniel's talk will explore some of the earliest and greatest
exponents of cartographic data visualization, including: “the  
best statistical graphic ever drawn”: a map depicting     
Napoleon’s doomed invasion of Russia; maps of the
international cotton trade before, during and after the America
Civil War; the first sociological maps of both the UK and USA;
the first epidemiological map; and the first geological map,
culminating in a discussion of the dispensation of
“topographical truth” with Harry Beck’s famous map of the
London Underground, a world standard for graphic clarity and
as “rational as a contemporary Mondrian painting,” proving the
American statistician John Tukey’s point that “the greatest  
value of a picture is when it forces us to notice what we never
expected to see.”

Free and open-to-the-public but please RSVP to:
MapSocietyNY@gmail.com
Tuesday, March 19, 2019, 6:30 pm: Christina Dando will speak on
"History of Women in Cartography."
Venue: New York Public Library, Stephen A. Schwarzman [Main] Building,
5th Ave. at 42nd St., New York City 10018
Christina E. Dando is Professor of Geography at the University of Nebraska
Omaha. She received her B.A. in Geography and English from the
University of North Dakota and her M.S. and Ph.D.s in Geography from the
University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is interested in gender and
geography: how landscape and environment have long been gendered, as
well as how gender impacts human experience and interaction with the
environment. She is a member of the American Association of Geographers
and of the Society of Woman Geographers.
Thursday, May 2, 2019, 6:30 pm: Matthew Edney will speak on
"The History of Cartography Project"
Venue: New York Public Library, Stephen A. Schwarzman [Main]
Building, 5th Ave. at 42nd St., New York City 10018
Edney is a professor of geography and (since 2007) the Osher
Professor in the History of Cartography, with responsibility for
courses in map history. He is also “faculty scholar” in the Osher Map
Library and Smith Center for Cartographic Education, Portland,
Maine. Since 2005 he has directed the History of Cartography
Project at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Wednesday, February 6, 2019, 6:30 pm: Scott Max Edelson will
speak about his book "The New Map of Empire: How Britain
Imagined America Before Independence"
Venue: Avenues: The World School, headquarters, 17th Floor
Boardroom, 11 East 26th St. (between Madison and Fifth Avenues), NYC
After the Treaty of Paris ended the Seven Years’ War in 1763, British
America stretched from Hudson Bay to the Florida Keys, from the
Atlantic coast to the Mississippi River, and across new islands in the
West Indies. To better rule these vast dominions, Britain set out to map
its new territories with unprecedented rigor and precision.  Edelson’s
"The New Map of Empire" pictures the contested geography of the
British Atlantic world and offers new explanations of the causes and
consequences of Britain’s imperial ambitions in the generation before  
the American Revolution.
Free and open-to-the-public but please RSVP to:
MapSocietyNY@gmail.com
Saturday, June 15, 2 pm: Members-Only "Show and Tell, followed by an end-of-program
year Social Hour at a TBD nearby bar
Avenues: The World School, headquarters, 17th Floor Boardroom, 11 East 26th St. (between
Madison and Fifth Avenues), New York City.
We already have four presenters out of a planned ten: Miklos Pinther, Jacob Ford,
Lawrence Stelter and Andrew Kapochunas.
If you'd like to present a map, please RSVP to: kapochunas@gmail.com
If you'd just like to attend, please RSVP to: MapSocietyNY@gmail.com
Daniel Crouch
Saturday, April 13, 2019, 2:00 pm: Susan Schulten will speak on
“How Maps Illuminate and Complicate the Past”
Venue: Avenues: The World School, headquarters, 17th Floor
Boardroom, 11 East 26th St. (between Madison and Fifth Avenues), NYC.
"Across five centuries, America has been defined through maps.
Whether handmaidens of diplomacy, tools of statecraft, instruments of
reform, or advertisements, maps document particular moments in time
but also shape the course of history. Join us as we explore a diverse
array of materials that both illuminate and complicate our understanding
of the past."
Susan is an American historian and professor at the University
of Denver. She graduated from U.C. Berkeley with a B.A., and from the
Univ. of Pennsylvania, with a PhD. In 2010 she received a Guggenheim
Fellowship. Her books include: "The Geographical Imagination in
America, 1880-1950," 2001; "Mapping the Nation: History and
Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America," 2012; and "A History of
America in 100 Maps," 2012, all published by Univ. of Chicago Press.
Free and open-to-the-public but please RSVP to:
MapSocietyNY@gmail.com
The Map as a Weapon
After the completion of the transcontinental
railroad, Chinese workers became the
target of vicious prejudice throughout the
west, particularly in California. The city
fathers of San Francisco designed this map
to characterize the residents of Chinatown
as the scourge of the city, taking care to
identify houses of prostitution, gambling,
and opium dens. This is just one example  
of maps designed to navigate the
unprecedented urbanization at the turn of
the century.